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here in the ukraine in the former soviet union in an area called a shtetl. an old jewish village. i'd like to show what happened to the jewish community in the past but even more importantly i would like to show you what the jewish community is like today in the former soviet union. i think you will be surprised. announcer: a 100 years ago russia was the center of the jewish world with 5 to 6 million jews living there. although russia's largest ethnic group, most lived in poverty and persecution. then came the bolshevik revolution. hoffman: the soviets systematically destroyed any kind of base for religious affiliation. they closed synagogues. they closed jewish schools, sent rabbis and teachers to jail and prison. and tried to convert everyone to their brand of materialist atheism. announcer: then came the nazis. between 1941 and 1945 soviet jews were savagely persecuted. subjected to every possible pain and humiliation and murdered in mass executions. eckstein: this is babiyar outside of kiev here in the ukraine. one of hundreds of killing fields from world war ii's holocaust thro
of the history, beginning in 1917, 1918 when the tray first sent troops into the soviet union as part of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states seem to recognize the soviets in 1933 under roosevelt. then during the '30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus in trying to stop hitler. the anti-fascist forces globally and the commons party was -- as a result of that. but then during the war, after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide they will support the soviet union because, to bring the service can keep the soviets in the war. the soviets were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the service would think -- capitulates at the moment. the united states offer several things. the soviets make several demands. the united states promises matÉriel and has a hard time living there for a number of reasons. in the first couple of years. stalin said if you give us the airplanes and other equipment that we need, the united states tries to roosevelt makes a
in a in a bipolar system, united states and soviet union. imagine that you have to do deterrence with unstable countries and with shifting alliances. how do you enforce or rely on deterrence in those circumstances. you can get accidental or unauthorized use, you can get theft, you can be the delivered proliferation in the hands of terrorists. imagine what al qaeda would do what it did on 9/11 if they would hesitate for a second if they got hair hand on nuclear weapons. that is the threat and the end of nonproliferation and the end of relying on deterrence. we always try to prevent a rise in the middle east in the control of the oil. that's why there was an iraq war in 1991 over the invasion of kuwait. what the arabs understand, once iran is nuclear it becomes the most aggressive islamic state in charge of the area in the middle east. that's why those have beseeched the united states to take out the nuclear program in advance. the saudis would line the deserts with arrows saying this way. lastly, i'm running out of time, i hope, perhaps you will resist from applauding at six-minute mark, or at
of the last 20 years since the soviet union fell apart. it's a history. it's a history of the oil industry, but also in parallel it's a history of russia these past 20 years. the initial collapse in the 990s and then the gradual recovery the decade after. so we end up with the russia that we see today after this long psych, and the -- cycle. it's a biography. it's a multiple biography of a number of people, but in particular of the clan that emerged in the 1990 from the city of st. petersburg. and came to moscow with putin in the year 2000. and you could sum up the last 20 years of russian history by saying that this is the revenge of st. petersburg over moscow as the clans from st. petersburg take over and are very largely without much exaggeration are in command. this is very much a st. petersburg crowd. is so a history of the emergence of that crowd, and this is the latest chapter in the 300-year rivalry between the two capitals, so it's a tale of two cities. it's a murder mystery, but i can't give you the names of the -- [laughter] the guilty ones in every case. but you can draw your o
of the former soviet union have always been one of history's most persecuted people suffering through stalin, hitler, and the holocaust and violent communist hitler, and the holocaust and violent communist repression. emigre: it was very dangerous because of the kgb and all of the government. it was so dangerous to show your judaism. emigre: they attempted to burn our house. they threw stones at our doors and they wrote on it death to the jews. emigre: every day on the bus they would yell at me, "go home jew! this is not your home!" emigre: because i am a jew, someone took a knife and cut up the front door to our apartment. this is no place for my daughter. we are leaving this is no place for my daughter. we are leaving this country. announcer: in 1989, the doors of the former soviet union finally opened. for most jews who had been denied jobs and forced into terrible poverty, , there was still no hope of having the means to ever realize their dream of returning to their homeland. but thanks to the help of the worldwide jewish community and programs like "on wings of eagles", what was only a
and soviet union. a bilateral stable system. imagine you have to do a deterrent with six, seven eight countries that are unstable, some revolutionary, and with shifting alliances. how do you enforce or rely on deterrence in those circumstances? you can get accidental or unauthorized use. you can get theft. you can get the deliberate proliferation into the hands of terrorists. imagine if al qaeda would do what it did on 9/11 if it would hesitate for a second if it got its hands on nukes and using a nuclear weapon on such an attack in the future. that's the threat, that's the end of nonproliferation and end of the reliance on deterrence. second, we have always tried to prevent a hedge mon rising in the middle east in control of the world's oil and strategically importance to the region. that's why there was an iraq war in 1991 over the invasion of kuwait. what the arabs understand in the region is that once iran is nuclear, it becomes the hedge mon of the region, the most aggressive radical islamist anti-western state in charge of the strategic area of the middle east. that's why the gu
is simple. i cover the former soviet union and russia. i could go on at great length about how boris yeltsin undermined democracy and became a hero democracy. lech walnsa in many ways was not the. working bloke many made him not to be. gorbachev was a visionary who came to power. he saw he needed to change the country. he used his powers to do that. he withdrew from afghanistan. he called for nuclear abolition. he worked with ronald reagan. he understood you need political solutions, not military solutions. when the soviet troops were ready to come out of the barracks so the berlin wall would not come down, he told them to stay in the barracks, the empire is going. we cannot be a country that will be one of glasnost and perestroika if we live the way we have. it is the 20th anniversary of the soviet union, the end of the soviet union. many people in russia blame him for the economic conditions in which they live. they blame him for the end of the country that many felt was the cradle to grave welfare state instead of a totalitarian system. i have great respect for him. you can also see peopl
is doing across the soviet union and specifically dealing with orphans and going into orphanages and giving them a message of hope and encouraging them. how does this new law -- does it affect the way you guys operate at all? >> this is not going to affect our ministry in russia, i don't think, at all. but, you know, what we are doing now, pushing harder the issue of mobilizing national christian families to adopt their own children. and unfortunately, the number of orphans in those institutions is not decreasing. it is growing. and it shows clearly that there are some moral issues within the family, society, etc. and that's what we're trying to do through our program. it is called "a home for every orphan." to train, to mobilize national christian families to adopt orphans within the country. and i don't think that this law will affect this work at all, to understand that there are so many children in those institutions that they need somebody's love. and so the christian families will make a decision, overcoming the sigm stigma that is there in the orphan society against orphans, and will
and said the to and stan she added in by the evil empire of the soviet union and the west, in his letter to his children which has been mentioned already come chambers said that in communism he saw, quote, the concentrated evil of our time. bill buckley looked upon the enormity of communism, and indeed come conservatives of all stripes could agree about the hideous mess of the communist system which is why the world of the cold war was in many ways a tidy. of the soviet union provided a sort of - rallying point, something that conservatives of all sorts could define themselves against and i wondered about today what about today, how do conservatives to find themselves? that's the question that i hope the panel was going to come up with, and before we take things over to them, i want to make briefly to final points and one of which is a couple times this afternoon. conservatives were virtually at one in regarding the freedom lacking in the of which eurocommunism with repugnance, they were not i believe quite so unified in understanding communism of the thinkers like chambers and buckley.
or the soviet union. self-protecting citizens won't have that right, criminals will. soviet union? how about keeping up with the class here. we got to look at this. here is david keene, who i have known for years. he's a hard conservative. here he is on "cbs this morning" talking about background checks. in this area i think people right, left, and center with any kind of rational sense know we have to do something. don't let criminals, don't let people with court-ordered mental situations where they have been ordered not to do things or been under watch to get ahold of guns. let's watch david keene on "cbs this morning." >> we want to see the proposal, but as a general proposition, the nra has been very supportive of doing background checks on purchasers through the instant system and, secondly, of adding the potentially violently mentally ill to the database. >> cynthia, you're shaking your head no -- >> no, the nra has opposed background checks for private sales. the nra has opposed background checks for sales at gun shows. the nra and other elements of the gun lobby are the groups that h
's lurch to the left and its inability to view the soviet union objectively and to concede that it was a clear and present danger. the case demonstrated the intimate connection between communism and liberalism, quote, when i took out my little fling and aimed at communism, chambers wrote in "witness," i also did something else. what i hit was the forces of that great socialist revolution which in the name of liberalism is been inching its ice cap. the one x liberal who saw the connection clearly was president ronald reagan. who awarded the medal of freedom. asked why, mr. reagan replied, 100 years ago people will ever forgotten the details but i want them to remember that out his went to jail as a traitor and whitaker chambers was honored by his fellow citizens. his conviction verify anti communism as a potent element of american politics. it gave bill buckley and other and other conservative they caused by which to unite traditional conservatives and libertarians against the common enemy, liberalism. historian george nash and others argued persuasively that without any com
civilization as we know it completely destroyed or completely change? the collapse of the soviet union meant that the future of communism was decided, however long it takes. it will collapse in china too i think. yet, his tragic sense of life would have kept him from being pollyannaish about western civilization. societies like human beings live by faith and die when faced dicey wrote. certainly in europe you would see that faith dying. similarly he would have watched faith, in that case and communism, died in the ussr and we are seeing faith in communism die in china. what he say dying slowly in our own country while yet it turned so rightly and so much of the muslim world or would he see the extraordinary extraction of christianity in africa, latin america or china or evangelic -- evangelicals in our own country as a new hope. i will leave that for discussion. thank you. [applause] >> i would like to begin by quoting admiral stockdale who famously asked, who am i and i and what am i doing here? that was the very question that came to me when nathaniel invited me to sit on this panel. the f
the implacable confrontation of communism by the evil empire, the soviet union and the west. in his preparatory letter to his children are which has been mentioned already, chambers said that in communism he saw quote the concentrated evil of our time. bill buckley looked with kindred eyes upon the enormity of communism. indeed, conservatives of all stripes could agree about hideousness of the communist system, which is why the world of the cold war was in many ways a tidier, more manichaean world than the one that we inhabited. whatever might be said about her, the soviet union provided a sort of negative rallying point, something that conservatives to find themselves against. and i wonder about today, what about today, how do conservatives define themselves? well, that's a question that i hope the panel is going to conjure with, and before turning things over to them, i want to make just two brief, two final points. one of which was raised a couple times this afternoon. if conservatives were virtually at one, regarding the freedom liking ideology of communism, they were not i believe quite so
to the lurch to the left and its refusal and an ability to view the soviet union objectively and to concede that it was a clear and present danger. .. >> asked why mr. reagan replied, because 100 years from now, people will have forgotten the details, but i want them to remember that alger hiss went to jail as a traitor here and whittaker chambers was honored by his fellow citizens. since his conviction, verified anti-communism as an potent -- they gave bill buckley another fusion is conservative to cause by which the conservatives and libertarians against a common enemy, liberalism. the historian george nash and others have argued persuasively that without any communism there would have been no unified conservative movement beginning in the 1950s. and without a conservative movement, there would have been no presidential candidate, barry goldwater, in 1964, and no president-elect reagan in 1980. "witness" is an essential work of the conservative canon. it may have enlisted more un-american anti-communist than any other book of the cold war. that included reagan, who could quote from memory
no farther tha denadi terkin. the year was 1987, and the former soviet union faced political changes. and he sat in prison. >> i had a ba bad reputation in prison. prisoners were even afraid of me. >> george: one day christians came to share the love of jesus. he says it was the first time he heard the message. but it took four years for it to sink in. >> in 1991, i dropped to my knees in the prison cell and told god i was a sinner. from that moment i went from serving satan to a servant of jesus. >> george: the prison miraculously shortened his sentence by five years, and he was released in 1996. the day after he walked out of prison, he walked into a bible training seminar, organized by russian ministries, which focuses on bringing the gospel to the former soviet union. >> russian ministries was very fundamental in my life. their classes taught me how to share my new faith with others. and they put in my heart to help change the next generations of leaders in my country. >> george: he was baptized shortly thereafter. now for over 10 years, he has been leading a church in the north crackcos
and he would even earn a measure respect and joseph stalin, the brutal to teeter at the soviet union. so what was said about harry that enabled him to climb to the pinnacle of wartime diplomacy on he was born in iowa, the son of an itinerant harness maker with champagne taste. his father traveled the midwives, hocking harnesses and gambling on bowling matches involving. his father was a ferocious they can have it in polar, that is another, and, with a straight churchgoing methodist and reliever in social justice and helping the poor. and it was his mother as to the settled down in grenell, iowa, the home of grenell college. and so for harry, grenell was founda, grenell was foundational. it had an amazingly impressive faculty at the time come in many of are devoted to what was then called the social gospel movement, the idea that the principles of christianity could be applied to solve both the nations social ills. harry graduated in may and 12 from grenell and followed in the foot steps of his sister, ada. he became a social worker and his first job was at the crease to do her house, a s
stalin, the brutal dick tater of the soviet union. so, what was it about harry that enabled him to climb to the pinnacle of wartime diplomacy? his origin gives you a few clues. he was born in iowa, the son, of an itinerant -- [inaudible] with champagne taste. his father, al, traveled the midwest, and gambling on bowling matches of all things. his father was a ferociously competitive bulwar boulder. but his mother, anna, was a strict churchgoing methodist and i believe in social justice and helping the poor. and it was his mother who insisted that the family settle down in grinnell iowa, the home of grinnell college. and so for harry, grinnell was foundational. it had an amazingly impressive faculty at the time. many of which were devoted to what was then called the social gospel movement, the idea that the principles of christianity could be applied to solve all the nations social ills. and harry graduated in 1912 from grinnell, and he followed in the footsteps of his sister. he became a social worker, and his first job was at the settlement house in the lower east side of manhattan, in
as after the soviet union was thrown out of afghanistan, we considered afghanistan not of any real interest to us and of course that's where al qaeda took root. so here again we've got that problem. and we cannot afford to let this just burgeon forth because you can see in the attack in algeria that american lives are at stake here. >> this was the point secretary clinton made as part of her testimony. she says anywhere the united states is not have a significant involvement, particularly in such areas of instability and a threat from a jihadist movement and affiliate say of al qaeda, there could be real problems. we see it in algeria and yet what did we hear from the president this week in his inaugural? basically the era of america's wars is ending. that does not suggest that he wants to get anymore involved in some of these new areas of instability. >> i think that's right. i think his basic instinct is one that's shared by the american people, which is you know after a decade of war in the greater middle east, we do not want to go back and repeat that exercise. and yet here we are in th
earn a measure of respect from joseph stalin, the brutal dictator of the soviet union. so what was it about harry? especially in typical of wartime diplomacy. his origin left a few clues. he was born in iowa. the sun of a furnace maker with champagne tastes. his father, he traveled the midwest gambling on bowling matches, of all things. his father was a ferociously competitive bowler. but his mother, anna, was a strict methodist and a believer in total justice and helping the poor. it was his mother, anna, who insisted that the family settle down and curnow, iowa. the home of grinnell college. so for kerry, grinnell was impressive at the time. it had an impressive faculty. they were devoted to the social gospel movement. the idea that the principles of christianity could be applied to solve all the nation's social ills. harry graduated in 1912 he followed in the footsteps of his sister, ada. he became a social worker. he became a worker at the settlement house of the lower east side of manhattan. the largest concentration of immigrants live there. for the next 20 years, beginni
at montclair state university in new jersey denying that the soviet union ever killed nebraska? he wrote a book called "crus chef lied," and lied in the speech. you know, he didn't own up to much in the secret speech, but it was a block buster speech, but he didn't own up to all that much, and here's a guy, an academic freedom, blah, blah, blah -- [laughter] let me ask you, would we have a holocaust with the fault -- really? i wonder. the aforementioned bob said this was in an interview with me a few years ago that in the academy there's a feeling of don't let's be too rude to stalin. he was a bad guy, yes, but the americans were bad guys too and so was the british empire. eric die the, and apologist for communism and stalin. bob, who told the truth about the soviet union won a degree from a university run by, a sadly corrupt president, i believe, who admired bob. that says something about academia and the world. did you see the poster the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, star of david, crescent and so on, and a hammer and cycle. there was a bit -- there's an outcry f
obsession this -- hiss chambers case perched to the left with the inability to look at the soviet union objectively and concede it was clear and present danger. with the intimate connection between communism and liberalism "when they took up my playing to a mechanism chambers wrote in "witness" i also hit were the forces of the great socialist revolution in the name of liberalism has been inching the icecap over the nation for two decades quote 41x liberal was president ronald reagan who awarded the medal of freedom in 1987 to whittaker chambers. when asked why he replied 100 years from now people will have forgotten the details by one of them to remember that alger hiss went to jail as a traitor ed whitaker chambers was honored by his fellow citizens. hiss conviction verified anticommunist as a potent element of american politics. a cave bill buckley a caused by which to unite libertarians against the common enemy. historian george nash and others have argued that without anti-communism there be no unified movement beginning in the 1950's and without a conservative movement no presiden
. it was only after the soviet union collapsed that they fell. this presents a paradox. what is required by pakistan is to address this challenge to cooperate with each other to realize. that is a was a scenario after two dozen for tank, there are -- there is the conflict need day and quickly. one can hope that the conflict is often time. the upside has a role. it is essentially to help the economy. the construction for stabilization to the us side players can best contribute by keeping and check -- scrutinizing the concerns the twitter villages. in my view, they can take care of the politics and the security. in these areas, they have confronted areas. thank you. >> thank you very much, ambassador. i think we will get a lot of questions on that. >> it is and honor -- i appreciate the honor. i want to make one point clear. i do not represent the government or nt 1 in afghanistan. some important points were raised about afghanistan. the major transitions they're going through a macro perspective. we are going through for transitions. we are going to an economic transition, a social transi
. >>> republican congressman paul broun says president obama is upholding the soviet union's constitution. is there one? i don't think there's a soviet union anymore. we're back on "hardball," the place for politics. [ male announcer ] wouldn't it be cool if we took the already great sentra apart and completely reimagined it with best-in-class combined mpg and more interior room than corolla and civic and a technology suite with bluetooth, navigation, and other handy stuff? yeah, that would be cool. introducing the all-new nissan sentra. it's our most innovative sentra ever. nissan. innovation that excites. now get a $169 per month lease on a new nissan sentra, plus $500 bonus cash. ♪ plus $500 bonus cash. iimagine living your life withss less chronic low back pain.. imagine you with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increas
obama is upholding the soviet union's constitution. is there one? i don't think there's a soviet union anymore. we're back on "hardball," the place for politics. [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections republican congressman paul it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. republican congressman paul republican congressman paul when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why th
, the united states, soviet union, a bilateral, stable system. imagine that you have to do a deterrence with six, seven, eight powers, countries that are unstable, some revolutionary and with shifting alliances. how do you enforce or rely on deterrents in those circumstances? you can get accidental or unauthorized use, you can get the deliberate proliferation into the hasn'ts of terrorists -- hands of terrorists. imagine if al qaeda would do what it did on 9/11, if would would hesitate for a second if it got its hands on nukes and using a nuclear weapon in such an attack in the future. that's the threat that's the end of nonproliferation and the end of a reliance on deterrence. second, we have always tried to prevent the hedge monday rising in the middle east, in control. that's why there was an iraq war in 1991, over the invasion of kuwait. what the arabs understand in the region is that once iran is nuclear it becomes the most aggressive radicaly islamist anti-western state in charge of this strategic area of the middle east. that's why the gulf states in private have besieged the uni
that the soviet union was the head of the united states in every military capacity. we were always ahead. a a but we were always the underdog in our own mind. central america, in regin's mine, becomes the bulwarks of communism. -- in ronald reagan's mind, becomes the bulwark of communism. they are going to come up. he is worried about what mollah, honduras, going read. central american molla countries going read. i saw soldiers there the reminded me of my own experience in vietnam, young, walking around, lost, white skin and all of that. i said do you remember vietnam? they said we do not want to talk about it. there were death squads, terror, the right wing parties of central america took they're not from reagan and karen -- nod from the reagan and killed dozens of people. out of the economics of ronald reagan, the south americans were decimated. the international monetary fund and world bank play a huge role. people turned against it. the leaders that came in at the 20th century were reactions against ronald reagan. >> you talk about obama, managing a wounded empire. you are fiercely c
the bomb. >> to intimidate the soviet union and give a clear barbaric message to stalin that we are the new order of business. you will not screw with the united states, and we're willing to kill people at any level. >> eliot: to defend the history books on this one the decision to use the bomb is a controversial decision, and its debated, and so the debate that you're joining on this issue is not one that's been hidden from those who study. >> in school textbooks are not so good on this. you don't get the clear alternative of the soviet invasion the negotiation for surrenders and truman knew that there were. >> the telegram from the japanese emperor asking for peace. >> eliot: but then again carried through. >> one other thing on that-- >> in the history books it says to save american lives. that's the mantra that we get and that's not true. >> eliot: it's to send a message. >> the invasion could have happened in november, you fill it in. >> generals who got their fifth star during world war two said the atomic bomb was militarily unnecessary. >> eliot: this is the debate that has been out
of the three b-52s every six hours toward the borders of the soviet union's. there would fly in circles round by the soviet border . there was a movie called failsafe which was based on a novel called fail-safe. also dr. strange love, stanley kubrick brilliant and funny money merely. i had seen the movie. i had seen doctor strange love. and did not know was about to be in it. these three planes in this cluttered each carried a four hydrogen bombs. each hydrogen bomb was 75 times more powerful the ball was dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki which brought world war 210 end. we're talking 300 times more powerful on each plane. each plane and four hydrogen bombs. and on the way to the soviet union, though i did not really need gas that much, kc-135 tankers from the american bases and we had and still have, i believe, the nuclear submarine base, but the airbase has long since been turned back to the spanish government. and by the way, one of the reasons why most of the people in the embassy, their job was to be cozy with the spanish government. one of the few people who especially right into the st
in every word i wrote about deterrence in 1984, dealing with the us and the soviet union, and it remains true today. but the idea that some technique like deterrence, because it worked in one context will always work, is mindless. i would say to my friend, f areed, wake up to the reality that israel-iran is not us- soviet. unlike the atheistic regime in the soviet union, iran has an apocalyptic idea of history. it sees itself as the instrument of that. wake up to the idea that in the 70 years of the soviet union, they never sent out a suicide bomber. for iran, martyrdom is the royal road to heaven. wake up to the idea that were fighting around the world, you love life, we love death. try deterring that. wake up to the idea that the nature of the dispute is completely different. russia was an ideological contest with united states. it never sought to wipe it off the map. iran believes that the existence of israel is a crime against humanity that it has to cure. lastly, wake up to the idea that the iranians themselves have told us what a intend in a nuclear exchange. again, the president
. this is the president. general, what if the soviet union, khrushchev, announces tomorrow which i think he will that if we attack cuba, that is going to be nuclear war? and what is your judgment as to the chances they will fire these things off if we invade cuba? eisenhower, oh, i don't believe they will. a point not elaborate on. and ellen, what i wanted to ask you, when you hear tapes and read transcripts from the missile crisis, one of the things that fascinates me is the extent to which berlin was on president kennedy's mind almost hourly. talk about that a little bit. and how could somebody like -- here we go. >> if we attack you become it's going to be nuclear war. and what is your judgment as to the chances they will fire these things off if we invade cuba? >> ellen, talk a little bit about this, 50 years later, people have forgotten a little bit as to how important considerations about berlin and our allies were throughout the missile crisis. >> yeah, it's clear, there's a wonderful transcript in the book in which president kennedy himself sort of gives an overview of what he think
reassuringly about deterrents. the stable deterrents in a bipolar system, united states, soviet union, bilateral stable system. imagine that you have to do a deterrence with six, seven, eight powers, countries that are unstable, some revolutionary and with shifting alliances. how do you enforce or rely on deterrence in those circumstances? you can get accidental or unauthorized use. you can get theft, you can get the deliberate proliferation into the hands of terrorists. imagine in al qaeda would do what it did on 9/11 if it would hesitate for a second if it got its hands on nukes and using a nuclear weapon in such an attack in the future. that's the threat, that's the end of nonproliferation and the end of reliance on deterrence. second, we have always tried to prevent a hegemon rising in the middle east in control of the world's oil and in control of the strategically important region. that's why there was an iraq war in 1991, the invasion of kuwait. with the arabs understanding in the region that once iran is nuclear, it becomes the hegemon of the region, the most aggressive, radic
at presidential second terms. one of the issues remembered by ronald reagan was dealing with the soviet union. explain the political situation in washington, d.c. that he was facing. guest: people who think of the reagan second term within the broad definitions of the curse, they refer to it asiran-contra. but also comprehensive tax reform, the elimination of an entire class of nuclear -eapons.-- refer to it as iran contra. but also comprehensive tax reform, the elimination of an entire class of nuclear weapons. reagan and his first term had spoken about the evil empire. one thing led to another. there had been no discernible progress. i do not think many people on january 20, 1981 would have anticipated ronald reagan's greatest historical accomplishment would be significant arms control. not just slowing the rate of increase in nuclear arms, but actually doing away with the whole class in what became known as the inf treaty. host: a speech in june of 1987 in berlin. [video clip] >> we welcome change and openness. we believe that freedom and security go together. the advance of human liberty,
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